Critical thinking skills graphic organizers

Graphic organizer template

One way I like to help…make it visual! Just put it in a dry erase sleeve! If you would rather hand out a printout or have students work electronically, check out the document download in the minilesson activity. Afterward, they should label the left column "Pro" and use it for positives and label the right column "Con" and use it for negatives. View "Comparing with a Venn Diagram" Minilesson Line Diagrams Classification Creating a line diagram can help students analyze the parts of something and how those parts interconnect. If you or your students have used the planning sheet to prepare for the project, you've already created a goal and objectives. This example shows the three branches of the U. Or you can use the digital download available in the minilesson activity.

What does deeper thinking look like in English language arts, science, social studies, and math? Students could use line diagrams to analyze the structure of an organization, the relationships between members in a family, the taxonomy of a species, or even the different types of verbs active, linking, and passive, with examples of each.

One way I like to help…make it visual!

Critical thinking skills graphic organizers

Using graphic organizers! As you can see I love just grabbing paper and making it visual. The minilesson activity has a document download that you can use as well. Being consistent and providing tons of models and repetition will really help! How about once they grasp picture level? This diagram compares two American presidents who were assassinated. Graphic organizers can help! Of course, time lines work well for historical events, like this time line of the life of Madame Curie. But we can help too! By walking step by step through the process of planning a project or activity, your students can think deeply about their work. View "Sequencing with a Timeline" Minilesson Pro-Con Charts Evaluation If you want students to evaluate the good and bad aspects of a topic, get them to create a pro-con chart. You can use this sheet to help students plan research reports, Web sites, community projects, or any other complex student-centered activity. Have students write the topic at the top of the page in a centered box. One way I like to help…make it visual! Westward Expansion.

You can use the sheet in your own planning as well, outlining a complex project for your students so that they fully understand your expectations. Download the planning sheet in the minilesson activity and provide it to students either on paper or digitally.

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This diagram compares two American presidents who were assassinated. Just put it in a dry erase sleeve! View "Creating a Plan" Minilesson Rubrics Evaluation You can create a quick rubric for any project by writing the Goal what students are doing and why and creating Objectives answering the 5 W's and H questions about the project: Who?

View "Sequencing with a Timeline" Minilesson Pro-Con Charts Evaluation If you want students to evaluate the good and bad aspects of a topic, get them to create a pro-con chart. Then lead them through the minilesson for filling out the sheet.

reading graphic organizers pdf

Or you can have students use the line diagram download in the minilesson activity. Of course, time lines work well for historical events, like this time line of the life of Madame Curie. By adding up the weighted score, the student arrived at a percentage score of the project.

critical thinking graphic organizers

This example shows the three branches of the U. Your students can use the Venn diagram to compare two characters, two methods for doing a division problem, or any other topics with comparisons and contrasts.

Compare and contrast graphic organizer

The minilesson activity includes a download of a Venn diagram template. You can use the sheet in your own planning as well, outlining a complex project for your students so that they fully understand your expectations. View "Evaluating with a Pro-Con Chart" Minilesson Cause-Effect Charts Causation When students think about causes and effects, they tend to think in a very linear fashion: The bat hits the ball and sends it over the fence. Have students write the topic at the top and then draw a vertical line. What does deeper thinking look like in English language arts, science, social studies, and math? Have students write the topic at the top of the page in a centered box. By walking step by step through the process of planning a project or activity, your students can think deeply about their work. Your students can use the Venn diagram to compare two characters, two methods for doing a division problem, or any other topics with comparisons and contrasts. The first column in the example rubric was created from the goal and objectives outlined in the planning sheet for the Westward Expansion video project. I like to start with pictures. You can also have students analyze a character from a novel or think deeply about an issue for an argument essay.
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Using Graphic Organizers to Work on Critical Thinking Skills in Speech Therapy