Field marshal haig hero or butcher

It is from a book called Field Marshal Haig, which was written by the historian Philip Warner in makes this source Secondary Evidence because it was written some time after the war.

general haig butcher of the somme

Never before had the defensive weapon attained so great a superiority over the offensive. Haig and his generals may not have been the team that the British army has ever produced but they were pretty good, and did their best.

churchill on haig

Here are some of the pro Haig points, "If the criterion of a successful general is to win wars, Haig must be judged a success". David Lloyd George, prime minister of a coalition government from Decemberhad questioned the point of launching another costly offensive at Passchendaele but Haig had got the backing of the Conservatives within the coalition and so got his way.

The battle, in Septemberwas the then biggest attack mounted by the BEF and the first time the Allies had used poison gas.

field marshal haigs miracle

Although the winning of the war had come at the sacrifice of a vast number of soldiers, we must not forget that the general had achieved his primary objective even if it had been accomplished in the most gruesome ways. This illustrates Haig as an inspirational leader as the soldiers had managed to maintain their morale through the war and no soldier had betrayed their country.

General haig war criminal

Yet the very nature of warfare during meant that offense was no match against deeply entrenched defence; the weapons of defence during the First World War were much superior to the weapons of offense. Gary Mead, in the best and fairest biography of Haig that I have read, calls him "enigmatic"; and this is perhaps a just assessment. Indeed, the bloodshed of the summer of has more or less been roundly laid at his door. He championed the rights of ex-servicemen and refused all state honours until the government improved their pensions, which duly came in August His war of attrition resulted in enormous numbers of British casualties and his leadership remains controversial. It is from a book called Field Marshal Haig, which was written by the historian Philip Warner in makes this source Secondary Evidence because it was written some time after the war. But the title of hero is still something the field marshal deserves as the method he used to try and achieve. In , he joined the forces of Lord Kitchener in the Sudan. But by then Haig was dead and unable to defend himself. Email justine. The result was an under-resourced attack in an unfavourable location of little to no strategic value. After the devastation of the war, many soldiers blamed Haig. Haig knew that Lloyd George wanted to be rid of him; he also knew the Prime Minister wasn't strong enough to do so. Haig was impressed and immediately ordered a thousand more. They died suffering from the beastly attitudes of the public towards our father.

Although he admitted he would be unable to break through at these points on the Western Front, he argued that in defending Verdun, the Germans would "bleed the French army white".

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Field Marshal Haig: “Hero or Butcher of the Somme”